Album Review — The Cadillac Three’s ‘COUNTRY FUZZ’

The Cadillac Three is a group I haven’t exactly embraced in the past. They were an easy target when they arrived on the scene amid the bro country era, especially being on a label like Big Machine that really pushed the sub-genre. But in hindsight I realized I was probably way too harsh on Jaren Johnston, Neil Mason, and Kelby Ray. I feel looking back that I didn’t view them objectively enough. So, I looked back through their discography and while they won’t be competing with Blackberry Smoke for the best modern country rock, I’ve realized this is a fun group that hits more than they miss. And on their newest album COUNTRY FUZZ, I think they’ve managed to put out their best album yet.

Opening track “Bar Round Here” is a feel-good bar anthem that’s easy to singalong with. It’s a fun song that hits just right at the end of a long work week. Also, it’s surprising to see Lori McKenna as a co-writer on this track, as this isn’t the type of song you’re used to seeing her pen. “The Jam” is another fun song that is a blast to both sing to and move to. It also shows off a funkier side of the group and it actually suits them well. The rhythmic guitars in juxtaposition with the bouncy drums helps this song easily live up to its name.

“Hard Out Here for a Country Boy” is a song on paper I wouldn’t enjoy, as the whole “I’m a country boy” theme is done to death in the genre. But the charisma of the trio along with guests Travis Tritt and Chris Janson makes the song instantly likeable and makes this common theme surprisingly work for me. It also helps that the sound is decidedly country with some well-placed crunchy harmonicas in the bridge. “Slow Rollin’” can feel a bit “butt rock-ish” at first, but upon repeat listens it’s really grown on me thanks to the song’s heavy guitar tones and it’s catchy lyrics.

“All the Makin’s of a Saturday Night” is one of my least favorite tracks on the album, as the group fails this time to make a well-worn theme work for me. The instrumentation just isn’t fun enough nor does it stand out. The lyrics aren’t really catchy either and the song is just too thin to really sink your teeth into. “Crackin’ Cold Ones with the Boys” is one of my favorites, as the group once again nails those heavy guitar tones that give the song both a head-bobbing quality and a sense of excitement. The hook is memorable too.

“Labels” is one of the more serious moments on the album, as the song is about not judging people by their looks and how there’s always more than meets the eye. While I would have liked for them to go a little bit deeper within the topic, it’s still an admirable message and they also still manage to put in some enjoyable guitar licks. “Raise Hell” is about coming to the realization of being a troublemaker, but also learning lessons from the years of raising hell. I particularly enjoy the funny line of “If me and the big man are on the outs then I guess I understand.” This song really highlights what I’ve realized is the secret sauce of this group and that’s their presentation and delivery. Their lyrics aren’t competing with Isbell anytime soon and their country rock sound isn’t unique. But they present it in a way that doesn’t take itself too seriously and is ultimately trying to just create a good time for the listener.

“Back Home” is about yearning to return to the sights and sounds of home. Again, this is a well-trodden theme of country music that I think The Cadillac Three manage to present as catchy, authentic and relatable to the average listener. Although I wouldn’t begrudge you for finding it a bit repetitive either. “Dirt Road Nights” is a slow, R&B-influenced jam about a couple getting nostalgic about cruising the backroads in their younger years. I like the theme, but I would have liked a little more “meat” to the story of the song to feel more connected to it. A little less repetitive and a little more background on the relationship the song focuses on.

“Blue El Camino” is everything you want in a country rock song: loud, in-your-face guitars that get you moving and an instantly catchy hook you’ll find humming to yourself long after listening to it. When I say want to hear more fun songs in country music again, this is it. “Jack Daniels’ Heart” is another song that’s a blast with it’s clever premise of pondering who was the girl who broke the heart of the famous whiskey maker. But it doesn’t matter as the song explains because the whiskey makes you forget. Throw in some great drumming from Mason that gives the song a beat with a real kick and this is again what I want out of a fun country song.

“Why Ya Gotta Go Out Like That” is a breakup song that gets a bit repetitive for my taste and at this point in the album the choice of making it 16 songs long is proving to be a stretch. I think this album would have benefitted more from knocking a few songs off it and staying closer to 12 songs in length, especially when a lot of the themes can get repetitive for some listeners. “Heat” is one of my favorites on this album with its swampy and smoky feel. I also love how Johnston delivers the hook with passion and authority, inviting the listener to want to shout along.

“Whiskey and Smoke” falls in the same category of “Why Ya Gotta Go Out Like That”; not necessarily a bad song, but unnecessary on an album at 16 songs that has other songs that cover the topic at hand much better. “Long After Last Call” is a softer love ballad that closes out the album. It’s a great choice for a closer due to its reflective, easy nature. It’s also a fitting conclusion that after all the fun and party throughout the album it ends with finding and cherishing that meaningful connection you want to keep going long after the party ends.

Fun is a word I repeat over and over in this review. And it’s for good reason: that’s the ultimate appeal of The Cadillac Three and their album COUNTRY FUZZ. It’s entertaining country rock that aims to help you have a good time and forget your worries. The lyrics aren’t deep, and they aren’t meant to be; they’re meant to singalong with and have fun. So while this album may not be one for the record books or album of the year lists, it is an album that entertains and it’s exactly what you’re looking for when you just want to listen to something with loud guitars and big hooks.

Grade: 8/10

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