Album Review — Texas Exit’s ‘Black Water’

So there are several methods I deploy to discover new music. One of my more odd methods is I sometimes just go through upcoming releases by genre on iTunes and listen to previews of albums based on if I find the cover art to be interesting. It’s weird I know and 9 times out of 10 the album ends up being something where I listen to a few songs, discard it and never mention it on this blog. But then every once in a while I find something worth posting about and this is how I found Texas Exit and their debut album Black Water.

There isn’t a lot about this band mentioned outside of their Facebook page. From what I can find, Texas Exit is a trio based out of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada made up of Ryan Irving (lead guitar, vocals), William McLeod (bass) and Jon Pord (drums). They’re self-described as a country/rock powerhouse band with influences rooted in 90s country and 80s rock, citing Van Halen, Brooks & Dunn and Pantera as influences. After listening to Black Water, this couldn’t be a more accurate description and I’m so glad they live up to this billing because I’m a sucker for both of these styles of music (especially fused together).

Right away you get blasted with some crunchy, ZZ Top-like guitars with “My Own Bartender.” It’s a rollicking, in your face drinking song that you want to play to kick off a wild Friday night. “Hurricane” is about finding love against all odds. It’s a simple love song with a relatable story and reminiscent of Creedence Clearwater Revival with it’s easy going melody. “When She Drinks” is straight 80s with it’s questionable opening line, but then it takes a funny left turn to describe a straight-laced working woman who enjoys staying in most nights and reading books. But when she does party and drink, she out drinks everybody. It’s not that original of a theme and the hair metal-like approach will rub a lot the wrong way, but I can also see the anthemic appeal of it too.

“Roll in the Sand” is what it sounds like: it’s about a drunken one-night stand. While it may be a bit more detailed for some listeners than they would like, the framing of the song from the point of wistful nostalgia and fondness I feel casts it in a better light than the majority of songs like this. Not to mention both sides know what they were in for and nobody appears to be used. It’s a just a story about a memory on a fun summer night. This is the type of simple storytelling that a lot of classic rock songs really excelled at (think songs like “Summer of ’69”).

Nostalgia is the center of “Home Again” too. This time it’s about revisiting home recalling the days of youth, specifically through the lens of the 90s. The guitar riff on this are so damn catchy and the singalong nature is just so much fun. And yeah as someone who grew up in the 90s, the lyrics are relatable (also this makes me feel old). Texas Exit doesn’t just excel at fun, guitar music though as they prove on “Empty Room.” It’s a dark, haunting and somber song about a father who lives in guilt over his missing daughter and is forced to live in heartbreak as he continues to search for her every day. The lingering steel guitar really adds to the sad nature of the song and gives it real levity behind some pretty dark lyrics.

Texas Exit stays in a dark place on the album’s title track, as it’s about an old dirt road that people go down to have fun and usually never return alive (but I thought it was all good times on a dirt road according to bro country). The thumping guitar is an instant toe tapper and head banger, matching the gritty lyrics well. Irving’s passionate delivery is great too. “My Something” is about a man who wants a woman, but she rejects him. Later she changes her mind and wants him back, only for him to turn the tables on her and reject her. It’s a great revenge song that conveys a well-deserved dishing of what goes around comes around while also avoiding being vindictive and petty like these types of songs often devolve into.

The reflective “Docks of P.E.I.” recalls a teenage romance that lingers in the mind of the man to this day, as he looks back with fondness upon the woman and the memories they made together. While the band goes to the nostalgia well a bit too much on this album, this song is arguably their best take on it, as the lyrics are well thought-out, heartfelt and the energetic piano play is really captivating. The band then goes out with a real bang on “Turns to Love.” Another song with fun guitar licks, but yet another song with great lyricism too. It’s about wanting to find love, even a bit desperate to find it and stuck in a bit of loneliness, yet in the end it focuses on the determination of the goal and finding someone who appreciates you for you. Yes, it’s a bit cheesy. But that’s 80s rock and part of what makes it so enjoyable.

Texas Exit delivers an absolute blast of a debut album in Black Water. While they definitely let their cited influences above shine through, personally the two bands I thought of when listening to this album are Molly Hatchet and Blackfoot, as the sound feels like it fits right in with those bands. While it’s understandable how a band wearing it’s influences on it’s sleeves can be a bit annoying, I find that Texas Exit does this in a way that feels like a good combination of homage and putting their own flair on it. While it’s easy to get lost in the fun guitar play, it’s the lyrics of this album that are it’s secret weapon and what makes this band stand out amongst other groups who attempt these popular sounds.

Grade: 8/10

Album Review — Brothers Osborne’s ‘Skeletons’

Now this is what I’m talking about! Those who have been following me as a music reviewer for a few years know that I’ve been more critical of the Brothers Osborne than many and that’s because I feel they haven’t lived up to their potential. Their debut album Pawn Shop was decent, but they definitely hit a sophomore slump with Port Saint Joe, a largely forgettable beach album. But with Skeletons they hit their sweet spot, a thumping and fun album that’s a good time from start to finish.

“Lighten Up” is a light and playful ode to finding silver linings in the chaotic world we live in and “All Night” is an absolute ear-worm with it’s catchy hooks. “All The Good Ones Are” has enjoyably slick guitar work with a cheeky theme of finding the most fun in the most dangerous situations. “I’m Not For Everyone” screams hit to me with it’s easygoing, sing-a-long nature and relatable premise. The album’s title track is fun, although it wears a bit quicker than the other fun tracks on the album, as it has one of the weaker hooks. Jay Joyce really excels with the production on this album, as it feels like he’s found the right sound for this duo and that excites me moving forward on future projects.

While this album has plenty of fun songs, it tackles other themes quite well too. “Back On The Bottle” is your classic country drinking song of finding joy in heartbreak through the bottle. And while it’s become a bit tiresome to have celebratory drinking songs in modern country, this song has enough charisma to win me over. “High Note” is a pleasant song about leaving a relationship on good terms and going out on a high note with one last hurrah. The soaring and smooth nature of this song is a nice breather too on an album full of “twangers” (country’s version of bangers).

The duo really surprise me when they drop an exciting instrumental in “Muskrat Greene.” It reminds me of when Brad Paisley would regularly sneak an instrumental onto the album and I wish more artists would do this. This instrumental segues nicely into “Deadman’s Curve,” a funny, yet serious song about trying to avoid falling in love with a woman who’s guaranteed to break your heart. “Make It A Good One” is admittedly a bit saccharine, but I can’t help but enjoy it’s sentiment. Not to mention I enjoy the lingering background synth in the chorus, as it really adds some emotion to the lyrics.

“Hatin’ Somebody” is a bit on the nose, but once again Brothers Osborne bring enough charisma to the table in both their vocal delivery and funky instrumentation that the message mostly sticks the landing. It would have been nice though to here some more depth behind this message beyond be nice and mindful of others. Closing song “Old Man’s Boots” is the only song on the album I skip most of the time, as it’s a mawkish, done-to-death theme that the duo fails to elevate and captivate my attention with.

Skeletons is easily the best album delivered by the Brothers Osborne so far. This duo at their best in my mind is the modern day version of Brooks & Dunn. What both of these duos excel at is delivering accessible, yet “smarter” versions of fun country music that doesn’t delve into mindless drivel like bro country nor does it feel forced like pop country. Then sprinkle in a few serious songs to give you a nice breather in between all of the partying and this is the perfect formula for the duo to follow. This is a really enjoyable album and definitely one of the top ten country albums you’ll hear in 2020.

Grade: 8/10

Album Review — Taylor Swift’s ‘folklore’

You know a blog with country in the name reviewing a folk-influenced Taylor Swift album doesn’t seem so farfetched. But this is surprisingly the first time I’ve ever reviewed a Taylor Swift album. It’s not that I haven’t listened to Swift’s music. If you’re a millennial you hear her music whether you want to or not. The timing simply hasn’t worked out for me to review it, as this was an only country blog when she went pop and her last two albums were quite frankly forgettable and not worth talking about. But her surprise new album folklore is certainly an album I have a lot to say about.

The first thing of course that stands out about this album is the production, helmed by her longtime producer Jack Antonoff and the National’s Aaron Dessner. Both of their influences shine through in the music, but especially Dessner’s, as this album certainly embraces indie and folk aesthetics. It’s not an indie folk album as many have erroneously called it, but rather a pop album that incorporates elements of modern indie, folk, bedroom pop and lo-fi. Swift cherrypicks some of the more obvious and basic elements of these styles and makes them work with her style of pop for the most part.

That leads me to the obvious comparison for this album, which is Lana Del Rey’s Norman Fucking Rockwell. While folklore may lack the subtlety of NFR and feels like a poor imitator of it to some listeners, I would argue folklore does a much better job in terms of memorable melody and catchy lyrics. This shouldn’t be a surprise, as Swift has an established history of this while Del Rey is more of a niche sound and audience. The TL;DR for this album is Swift is taking a bunch of elements of several albums and popular styles in the indie world in recent years and putting on pop polish with her own style. This comes off as either too simplistic or an enjoyable compromise. For me it’s the latter.

“the 1” is a great opener to the album, as the song sets the overarching theme and that’s regrets, what-ifs and trying to learn from the loss of a meaningful relationship. I also enjoy how well Swift conveys both wistfulness and heartache, as it shows how caught between emotions you are when wondering what could have been. “cardigan” continues this theme, but it’s the first of a handful of songs on this album that just completely overstay their welcome and ultimately lead to a slightly longer album runtime than necessary.

“the last great american dynasty” took several listens to grow on me, as I kind of struggled to find the point this song is trying to make and what I come up with is it’s a critical commentary on wealth, privilege and sex. The middle class wife is solely blamed for the downfall of a wealthy family, even though there’s nothing to judge by this other than the snide judgements casted from onlookers. The song appropriately ends from the first-person point of view of the wife, who seems to sarcastically agree with the speculation. It’s great storytelling from Swift.

Bon Iver joins Swift on “exile” and while I normally don’t enjoy his voice, I think Bon Iver and Swift sound pretty good together. This song about casting away exes surprisingly works well as a duet and I enjoy the climactic build in the second half of the song as the duo harmonizes. “my tears ricochet” is about questioning how an ex can be so dishonest about the nature of the relationship and feeling like your emotions about the relationship don’t mean anything to them. The mental image of tears ricocheting off the ex is such an excellent metaphor, perfectly showcasing their heartlessness and disregard on the outside. But internally the ex is not okay and their former partner rightly sees their outward righteousness as hollow and insincere. Or at least they like to think this. This song is such a fantastic display of the complexity of emotions when in the immediate fallout of a relationship.

“mirrorball” is about being a mirror for your partner and while this is an intriguing concept supported by great lyrics, the production is the highlight of this song. The sweeping and relax, Enya-like sound is gorgeous and easy to get wrapped up in. “seven” is a brooding and meditative story of hanging onto love. The modern meets classical, string-driven sound gives the song an appropriately nostalgic feel. “august” is about realizing your relationship was never what you thought it was when you were in it. It was just a fun summer memory that leaves one side of the relationship feeling a mix of regret and fondness. I really enjoy the soaring nature of Swift’s voice and the production throughout and then concluding in a symphonic-like finale, much like the relationship described in the song.

“this is me trying” features some of the sharpest one liners I’ve heard from Swift. The obvious one of course is “So I got wasted like all my potential,” which is a sharp rebuke to the criticisms being lobbed at the protagonist. “I had the shiniest wheels, now they’re rusting” is another clever conveyance of the disappointment of the protagonist, who after what sounds like a long time of regret is at the front door of their ex and trying to fix what was done. The droning organ that lingers throughout gives the song a hypnotically melancholy sound and gives it such swelling emotion.

There are three songs on this album that I can hands down say are now amongst my favorite Swift songs and the first is “illicit affairs.” Again, Swift does so well at describing the fallout of a breakup. The beginning of the song is level-headed introspection about how the relationship failed and learning from it. It also features the superb use of “clandestine” and yes I’m a music nerd because I love when a song takes a rarely used word in songs and uses it perfectly (see also Eric Church with incandescent). The second half of the song is an enjoyable burst of righteous indignation and anger that comes in admitting that an ex has changed you as painful as it is to admit. The depth and maturity on display in this song is so good and it’s easily one of my most played songs on this record.

Remember how I said “cardigan” is one of a handful of songs that would have been better with a shorter runtime? Well “invisible string” and “mad woman” are amongst these songs. The concepts for these songs are good and they very much fit the theme of the album, but they’re not really necessary and the album would benefit more for their absence than their presence, as this album’s biggest flaw is it’s too long. If this album was a bit tighter, this album is maybe a challenger for Country Perspective’s Album of the Year. “epiphany” is a beautiful sounding song that’s contrasted by war imagery as the story is of a soldier who seeks a reassuring dream as they bleed to death on a hospital bed. It’s dark, haunting and tragic, capturing all the emotions of a solider of war. It’s one of Swift’s finest songs she’s ever written.

And of course “betty” is the third song that’s now amongst my favorites from Swift. I was hooked from the moment I heard the sweet sounds of the harmonica. Told from the point of view of a 17-year-old boy, he recounts over a summer how he hurt a girl he loved and lives with regret for months as he tries to figure out how to apologize. It’s a song about finding growth and learning how it’s okay to admit when you make a mistake. As everyone knows, Swift became a household name on songs about high school romance. Most of those songs made me gag for their immaturity, mawkishness and being completely out of touch with reality. But this song is the opposite of all these criticisms. And damn it’s so catchy too. Can Swift come back to country music?

“peace” is another production standout on this album. The combination of the Mellotron, bass and synthesizers is so smooth and infectious. It’s such an overall minimalist approach, yet it’s one of the most powerful sounding tracks on the album. Antonoff and Dessner hit a real home run and I think it would have been great to conclude the album here. It’s not that closing track “hoax” is bad though, as it’s actually quite good. It’s a somber piano ballad where all the sadness of a relationship being over is swallowed with crushing pain and aches. It’s the reaching of a total state of being broke with the only thing to show for now being the road ahead and a body and mind covered in scars.

Grade: 8/10

The Endless Music Odyssey, Vol. 6 — Reba, Keith Urban, Travis Tritt & more!

Reba McEntireRumor Has It (30th Anniversary Edition)

A classic album full of great love songs and heartbreakers with the iconic “Fancy” that I’m glad to see is getting a special anniversary release. If you’re a country fan and you haven’t heard this, you need to change this asap. One day I hope to give a full review of this album, along with many other past releases. Anyway, this anniversary edition comes with two new additions: a live version of “Fancy” and a Dave Audé remix of it. I want to talk about the latter, as once again Audé delivers a fun remix of a classic country song.

I know remixes aren’t exactly looked well upon by a lot of people in country music, but to me there’s everything to gain by releasing remixes of old country songs. At worst everybody ignores it and keeps listening to the original. But on the other hand you could entice a young listener who isn’t familiar with it to get into country music. Now some might argue this is the wrong way to get someone into country music through something that is sonically not country. But the biggest appeal for me in country music is the lyrics. “Fancy” is iconic because of the story, not the instrumentation. There are thousands of songs with the same sound as this remix and they remain ignored in a metaphorical music landfill. So if someone can find appeal in this remix of “Fancy,” I like to believe it’s because of the song itself.

Keith UrbanTHE SPEED OF NOW Part 1

You know this album starts out promising enough. Opening song “Out The Cage” has the kind of frenetic energy you want to open an album that grabs your attention. The P!nk duet “One Too Many” isn’t terrible, although a bit boring and run of the mill. “Live With” is actually quite enjoyable, as the chorus is catchy and has a good message about seeking a life that can be enjoyed. Not to mention the incorporation of Urban’s solid guitar work gives the song a needed punch. “Superman” is solid pop music with connectable imagery, even though the lyrics are a bit cliché.

With the exception of the nice collaboration with Eric Church on “We Were,” the rest of the album is quite vanilla and goes in one ear and out the other. In other words, what’s been the story for Urban on the last several albums. While the experimentation of Urban in his music was interesting at first, I think he’s well past due to get back to his roots and that’s guitar-driven music. But I don’t foresee this happening, as Urban seemingly got bored with this type of music. So since Urban seems hellbent on continuing the experimenting, here’s ultimately the biggest problem with it: it feels like he just wants to be the Ed Sheeran of country music.

Just like Sheeran in pop, Urban is trying to be everything to everybody and as the old saying goes, if you’re trying to please all, you’ll please none. I guess the most realistic ask I’m hoping from for Urban then is to pick a lane for an album and stick with it throughout. There’s just no constant theme with his albums anymore. It’s just jumping from one thing to the next and as an album listener I become frustrated quickly. Also two thoughts on “We Were.” First, there’s absolutely no need to have the non-Church version of the song. Second, I find it amusing a country artist adding a country artist to a song to make the sound more country to be hilarious. 4/10

Travis Tritt – “Ghost Town Nation”

I’ve quietly been waiting to see what comes of Travis Tritt’s team up with producer Dave Cobb on his new upcoming album and this is the first look. And I have to say I’m looking forward more to what’s in store. This is a great lead single that speaks to the divide between the rural people in towns across America and the media. The term “ghost town nation” is appropriate in this context as it reflects not only how small town America feels like everybody turns their noses up at them and that “there’s nothing there,” but also the loss of jobs and collapse of rural America due to the loss of manufacturing and other industries. If anybody can shine a spotlight on this divide in a way that’s articulate and gives insight to the issues faced by the average, small town American and their feelings of alienation, it’s Travis Tritt. 

NasKing’s Disease

You know I really wanted to enjoy this album. Nas is one of the all-time great rappers in the history of hip-hop and is required listening for anybody who has any kind of interest in the genre. But this album feels too same-y in so many spots and this makes for a tedious listen at times. Songs like “Ultra Black,” “All Bad” and “10 Points” are great, but in between these standout moments are songs that just don’t really stand out in terms of production or lyrics. Of course when you’ve set the bar as high as Nas has with previous albums, that undoubtedly hurts perception of new albums. While this is not a good album, it’s not bad either and it’s worth your time to spin through it once. 6/10

Aaron Frazer – “Bad News”

The fantastic drummer and falsetto vocalist for Durand Jones and the Indications teaming up with Easy Eye Sounds and Dan Auerbach is a combination that absolutely excites me on paper. Each have a foot solidly in the classic/throwback world while delivering lyrics that are modern and fresh. After hearing this enjoyably funky and soulful lead single, rest assured this debut album is one already on my radar for 2021. 

Texas HillTexas Hill EP

A brand new trio formed between Adam Wakefield, Casey James and Craig Wayne Boyd, I was intrigued by this grouping. Their obvious commonality of course is their backgrounds, as they each come from music competition shows. Each hasn’t really had the success as solo artists as I imagine they would prefer, so forming this trio is a pretty good idea. And I will say it’s clear right away their voices harmonize quite well together. Blending country, rock and soul, it’s a catchy sound too. They’ve said though they recorded a dozen songs together, so this EP is only a teaser of the full offering to come. So I’ll keep my comments on the vague side for now, as I want to hear the full project before offering my full thoughts. I’ll say this though: Texas Hill shows a lot of potential with these songs and I’m looking forward to hear what else they have in store. 

The Allman Betts BandBless Your Heart

This is a band on paper that is very much in the same vein of bands like Blackberry Smoke and The Wild Feathers. It’s a band I expect to enjoy, so I expected great things from this album. But there’s a big issue that prevents it from being enjoyable and that’s it’s runtime. There’s no reason why this album should be over an hour long. If you cut about 25 minutes from this album it would be a much better listen, but instead of this album concluding when it hits the sweet spot, it well overstays it’s welcome and makes me not want to revisit it. An undoubtedly talented band that fell into the trap a lot of younger acts fall into with albums. 6/10

JojiNectar

Once again this is another example of an album going way too long. Clocking in at just under an hour, there are multiple songs on this album that feel like a repetition of a previous song. Trim it down to around 30 minutes and this album would have gotten a full review and recommendation from me because Joji has a lot of great ideas, especially production-wise, throughout this album. “Ew” is a fantastically melancholy song about not feeling like enough in the wake of a breakup. “Tick Tock” and “Gimme Love” are absolute jams. Joji shows great introspection on “High Hopes” and “Mr. Hollywood” too. But unlike The Allman Betts Band, Joji’s longer than necessary runtime feels more like a major label trying to game streaming numbers. Despite my issues with this album though, Nectar is worth a listen if you’re into darker, “crying in the club” type R&B-influenced pop music. 6/10

Album Review — The Wild Feathers’ ‘Greetings from the Neon Frontier’

[This post originally appeared on Fusion Country in July 2018. It’s being re-posted for reader visibility and appears as it was originally posted, with the only changes being for grammar/spelling.]

This sounds a lot like the Eagles. That’s what I imagine The Wild Feathers hear a lot when someone first comes upon their music. While this is a tiring and obvious observation, it’s hard not to compare this country rock band to bands like the Eagles, Poco, Gram Parsons and Pure Prairie League who rose to prominence during the early 1970s. But don’t get hung up on the past, as these guys bring a modern take to a classic sound. The Wild Feathers are Taylor Burns, Ricky Young, Joel King and Ben Dumas and together they make the kind of melodic, guitar-driven music that quite frankly is missing a lot in today’s music. On their new album Greetings from the Neon Frontier, they deliver a warm and breezy sound that takes you away and makes you wish would come back.

The album greets you with the anthemic “Quittin’ Time.” It’s a thumping and head-banging rocker that perfectly sets the tone for the album and has you singing along by the end of the first listen. “Wildfire” is a song that immediately stands out on the album. It’s an easy-going, mellow song that you want to play when driving down a seaside highway. Its carefree tone immediately endears you. The harmonies from The Wild Feathers are fantastically infectious and appropriately are the centerpiece of the song. “Stand By You” is a song about togetherness and standing alongside the one you love through thick and thin. It’s a simple love song that avoids the pitfalls of being too saccharine or paint-by-the-numbers, but at the same time it’s missing something to make it emotionally stand out better.

One of the clear strengths of The Wild Feathers is their sound, as they clearly know who they are and what their strength is as a band. I think “No Man’s Land” is a great demonstration of it. It’s about wanting to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and getting away to the peace and quiet of the countryside. Now this theme is nothing new, but it’s the instrumentation that gives this song a liveliness that sticks with you. Particularly the jam-y outro of the song with the extended guitar solos really gives it a punch. The fiddle-driven “Two Broken Hearts” is the quietest moment on the album. The song is about the heartbreak of a failed relationship and the regret of letting a special love slip, as the line “And I’ll always regret never buying you that ring” alludes. The production of this song does a great job conveying the heartache, as the slow and tender fiddles paints the picture of a man drinking in the dark over lost love. It’s a pretty good song, although sonically it doesn’t fit the rest of the album.

The B-side of this album might be one of the strongest I’ve heard all year. While this album is great throughout, it’s the second half of this album that really show The Wild Feathers at their best. Nostalgia and reflection are the topic of “Golden Days.” It’s about not truly enjoying and appreciating what you have in front of you until it’s gone. The song puts you in mind of the end of a long summer full of memories, but realizing you’ll never get them back. It’s a happy and sad feeling all at once.

“Big Sky” has the same quality of breeziness about it as “Wildfire.” It’s the perfect summer driving music with its hazy, atmospheric guitars playing throughout. “Wide open spaces/Cool mountain breezes/Reaching down to save my soul/Take these city blues away” really do take you away to that very scene in your mind. It’s really important on atmosphere-based songs (and albums) to establish that scene in the listener’s head; otherwise the words don’t connect with you. And as The Wild Feathers demonstrate throughout this album, they are quite good at this. The harmonies really shine again on “Hold Onto Love.” It’s about a long and loving relationship that has plenty of rocky moments, but it’s the resolve and strength of love that carries them through the hardships. Sometimes you’re just holding onto each other for dear life and it’s these moments where you realize how important it is to have each other. This is a song that relies on heart to reach you and I think everything in this song works together well to accomplish it.

“Every Morning I Quit Drinkin’” is about not being able to give up the sins of drinking and partying. While the party is fun at night, the regret in the morning is even worse (I imagine the hangover is too). It’s a broken solution to a never-ending heartache. The ominous outro of the song adds to the emotions of the song, with the hazy instrumentation putting you in mind of someone lying on the floor after a night of drinking. The album closes with the upbeat and fun “Daybreaker (Into The Great Unknown).” It’s a mantra to life on the road, living life to the fullest and always chasing your passion. The bouncing energy of this song makes it a great closer that not only ends the album with a bang, but also makes you want to revisit it all over again.

The Wild Feathers impress me with their brand of country rock on Greetings From The Neon Frontier. This band has a tight, cohesive sound that borrows from the late 70s era of country rock while also sounding fresh and modern-day. What this band absolutely excels at is their ability to paint a picture in your head with their music. Their lyrics are descriptive, engaging and cleverly composed, while the instrumentation compliments the words well and add to the scene of the song. Their others strength is their soaring harmonies, which they shouldn’t be afraid to let shine more. Greetings from the Neon Frontier is a memorably fun album of country-flavored rock and roll that can be enjoyed both quietly and at full volume.

Grade: 8/10