Album Review – Kenny Chesney’s ‘Cosmic Hallelujah’

kenny-chesney-cosmic-bullshit

If you asked me what mainstream country artist I get questioned the most on when it comes to my position on them, it would be hands down Kenny Chesney. I usually have a pretty negative or lukewarm take on his music and this seems to take a good bit of people off guard, much to my surprise. I’m not sure why I’m supposed to be impressed by an artist whose career has consisted mostly of music about the beach, simplistic themes that have been done to death and drinking. I thought his last album The Big Revival really drove this across, but apparently it didn’t. So now Chesney returns with the followup to it, Cosmic Hallelujah. This title just screams bullshit to me, but I still gave it chance since there’s not many other releases coming up in November. It was pretty much what I expected all along and further reinforced my stance on his music because Chesney does absolute nothing new on this album.

This is same old tired schtick from Chesney I’ve heard for years from him. There’s a boring, generic song about how we should live it up because we’re alive, so let’s crack a can of (insert current Chesney beer sponsor) and party that I feel like I’ve heard a 1,001 times and counting. Can you guess which song I’m referring to? Trick question! This actually refers to multiple songs, including “Trip Around the Sun,” “Some Town, Somewhere” and “Winnebago.” Of course pretty much every song alludes to this theme in some way or another. Chesney sings about only listening to pretty girls on “All the Pretty Girls.” I don’t what the hell the appeal of this song is and I don’t really want to waste precious air and time on trying to figure it out. It’s three and a half minutes I’ll never get back.

“Setting The World On Fire” is this album’s big hit so far, despite the fact the guest of the song Pink sings more than purported main artist of the song, Chesney. The only thing I have to further add about this song is I would rather be listening to Pink over Chesney any day because her music is actually interesting. There’s a song on this album called “Bar at the End of the World,” which makes no sense because I thought Chesney and Pink already set the world on fire. Yeah I know this is a bad joke, but I assure you that this is more interesting than the song, which is also a bad joke.

I was expecting to like at least one song on the album and the most likely candidate seemed to be “Jesus and Elvis.” That’s because two of the three songwriters on the song are Hayes Carll and Allison Moorer, who I greatly respect and enjoy their work. Well I don’t even like this one because this song seems to have an idea, but never does anything with it. The theme seems to be reuniting with old friends, but this is never expanded upon or has anything meaningful to say. We just keep hearing Chesney drone on about velvet paintings of Jesus and Elvis. The album’s lead single “Noise” is so damn boring that country radio didn’t even like it and they’ll usually play any bullshit Chesney sends to them. That should tell you all you need to know about this lame attempt by Chesney to say something about the prevalence of media today. What’s sad is this is probably the best song on Cosmic Hallelujah. And I haven’t gotten to the very worst of this album.

I’m on record as not being a fan of Chesney’s hit song “Boys of Fall” due to the fact it’s a song that over-glorifies high school football to the point I want to puke and features some of the most saccharine bullshit I’ve ever seen spewed about sports. And this comes from a sport fans. So you can put me down for the same thing when it comes to this album’s concluding song “Coach.” Also I’m officially predicting this will be Chesney’s current single in the fall of 2017. If I had to pick the dumbest song of the album, it would have to go to “Bucket.” Written by Brett James and Craig Wiseman, this song is getting drunk and saying fuck it to your responsibilities. This isn’t just me showing anger; this is what the song is actually about as Chesney sings a line about how you should replace the b in bucket list with an f. Some will argue this is just a dumb fun song, but I argue this is just plain dumb.

There’s a lot of boring crap on this album and it makes me want to rip my hair out. But there’s only song on this album that really pisses me off and that’s “Rich and Miserable.” This might be the worst song of Chesney’s entire career, even worse than “She Thinks My Tractor’s Sexy.” It’s a stilted, clunky, heavily pop influenced song that is essentially “Noise 2: Electric Boogaloo.” Chesney does not sing on this song, but is rather somewhere between shouting and mumbling. I think the title of the song perfectly personifies where Chesney’s career and mindset is at this time.

I can confidently say after listening to Kenny Chesney’s Cosmic Hallelujah that I never want to hear it again for the rest of my life. I absolutely hate this album and I was actively angry as I forced myself to listen to it. If you made me choose between listening to this album or Florida Georgia Line’s newest album Dig Your Roots, I would choose the latter every single time because the latter actually has some good songs. Chesney clearly isn’t trying anymore and just wants this paycheck. At this point he’s just rehashing the same old songs we’ve heard from him year after year.

Grade: 3/10

 

Recommend? – Hell No!

Album Highlights: Zero. Zilch. Nada. Nothing to see here.

Bad Songs: Rich and Miserable, Coach, Bucket, All the Pretty Girls

Wallpaper: The rest of the album


Stream The Entire Album Below I Guess:

The Current Pulse of Americana Music [June 13]

Colvin & Earle

Each week I will take a look at the Americana Music Association’s Americana Airplay chart and grade the top 20 albums on the chart. The grading format I use each week is every album will receive either a +1, -1 or a 0. These will then be tallied up for an overall score, or pulse of the current top 20 Americana albums, with the highest possible score being a +20 and the lowest possible score being a -20. How do I determine if an album is rated a +1, -1 or 0? The rating it received on the site or myself will determine this. If it hasn’t been rated yet, then I will make the call. Albums rated between 7 and 10 receive a +1. Albums rated a 5 or 6 receive a 0. Albums rated 4 or lower receive a -1.

The goal of this exercise is to evaluate the current state of Americana music and determine if it’s improving or getting worse. Let’s take a look at this week’s top 20…

  1. Colvin & Earle – Colvin & Earle +1 (Up 10)
  2. Mudcrutch – 2 +1 (Up 4)
  3. The Jayhawks – Paging Mr. Proust (Down 2)
  4. Sturgill Simpson – A Sailor’s Guide To Earth +1 (Down 1)
  5. Hayes Carll – Lovers And Leavers (Down 3)
  6. Darrell Scott – Couchville Sessions +1 (Up 2)
  7. Parker Millsap – The Very Last Day +1 (Down 2)
  8. Margo Price – Midwest Farmer’s Daughter +1 (Down 1)
  9. The Lumineers – Cleopatra +1 (Down 5)
  10. Hard Working Americans – Rest in Chaos (Down 1)
  11. The Honeycutters – On The Ropes +1 (Down 1)
  12. Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals – Call It What It Is (Up 2)
  13. Avett Brothers – True Sadness (Up 2)
  14. Bonnie Bishop – Ain’t Who I Was +1 (Up 5)
  15. Bonnie Raitt – Dig in Deep +1 (Down 3)
  16. Paul Simon – Stranger to Stranger (New to Top 20)
  17. Robert Ellis – Robert Ellis +1 (New to Top 20)
  18. Peter Wolf – A Cure For Loneliness (Down 2)
  19. John Doe – Westerner (Down 6)
  20. Charlie Faye & The Fayettes – Charlie Faye & The Fayettes (New to Top 20)

The Current Pulse of Americana Music: +11

The pulse improved one spot this week.

Albums That Dropped Out of the Top 20 This Week

  • Tedeschi Trucks Band – Let Me Get By
  • The Record Company – Give It Back To You
  • Loretta Lynn – Full Circle

Albums That Entered The Top 20 This Week

  • Paul Simon – Stranger to Stranger
  • Robert Ellis – Robert Ellis
  • Charlie Faye & The Fayettes – Charlie Faye & The Fayettes

Album I Predict Will Be #1 Next Week

  • Mudcrutch – 2

Biggest Gainers This Week

  • Paul Simon – Stranger to Stranger – Up 13 from #29 to #16
  • Colvin & Earle – Colvin & Earle – Up 11 from #11 to #1
  • Bonnie Bishop – Ain’t Who I Was – Up 5 from #19 to #14
  • Robert Ellis – Robert Ellis – Up 5 from #22 to #17

Biggest Losers This Week

  • Tedeschi Trucks Band – Let Me Get By – Out of the Top 20
  • The Record Company – Give It Back To You – Out of the Top 20
  • Loretta Lynn – Full Circle – Out of the Top 20

The Current Pulse of Americana Music [June 6]

The Jayhawks Paging Mr. Proust

Each week I will take a look at the Americana Music Association’s Americana Airplay chart and grade the top 20 albums on the chart. The grading format I use each week is every album will receive either a +1, -1 or a 0. These will then be tallied up for an overall score, or pulse of the current top 20 Americana albums, with the highest possible score being a +20 and the lowest possible score being a -20. How do I determine if an album is rated a +1, -1 or 0? The rating it received on the site or myself will determine this. If it hasn’t been rated yet, then I will make the call. Albums rated between 7 and 10 receive a +1. Albums rated a 5 or 6 receive a 0. Albums rated 4 or lower receive a -1.

The goal of this exercise is to evaluate the current state of Americana music and determine if it’s improving or getting worse. Let’s take a look at this week’s top 20…

  1. The Jayhawks – Paging Mr. Proust (Up 1)
  2. Hayes Carll – Lovers And Leavers (Down 1)
  3. Sturgill Simpson – A Sailor’s Guide To Earth +1 (Up 2)
  4. The Lumineers – Cleopatra +1 (Down 1)
  5. Parker Millsap – The Very Last Day +1 (Down 1)
  6. Mudcrutch – 2 +1 (Up 4)
  7. Margo Price – Midwest Farmer’s Daughter +1 (Down 1)
  8. Darrell Scott – Couchville Sessions +1
  9. Hard Working Americans – Rest in Chaos (Down 2)
  10. The Honeycutters – On The Ropes +1 (Up 6)
  11. Colvin & Earle – Colvin & Earle (New to Top 20)
  12. Bonnie Raitt – Dig in Deep +1 (Down 3)
  13. John Doe – Westerner (Down 1)
  14. Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals – Call It What It Is (Down 3)
  15. Avett Brothers – True Sadness (Up 3)
  16. Peter Wolf – A Cure For Loneliness (Down 3)
  17. Tedeschi Trucks Band – Let Me Get By (Down 3)
  18. The Record Company – Let Me Get By (Down 1)
  19. Bonnie Bishop – Ain’t Who I Was +1 (Up 2)
  20. Loretta Lynn – Full Circle +1 (Down 5)

The Current Pulse of Americana Music: +10

The pulse is starting anew this week with the Americana Airplay Top 20.

Albums That Dropped Out of the Top 20 This Week

  • N/A

Albums That Entered The Top 20 This Week

  • Colvin & Earle – Colvin & Earle

Album I Predict Will Be #1 Next Week

  • Sturgill Simpson – A Sailor’s Guide To Earth

Biggest Gainers This Week

  • Colvin & Earle – Colvin & Earle – Up 16 from #27 to #11
  • The Honeycutters – On The Ropes – Up 6 from #16 to #10
  • Mudcrutch – 2 – Up 4 from #10 to #6

Biggest Losers This Week

  • N/A

The Hodgepodge: Remembering Merle Haggard

Merle Haggard April 6, 1937 – April 6, 2016

In an old boxcar converted into a house, Merle Haggard was born in Oildale, California on April 6, 1937. Growing up, Haggard developed a rebellious attitude after losing his father, Jim, to a stroke while Merle was only nine years old. Criminal activity became a normal way of life for Haggard who would be put into juvenile detention centers only to try to escape. Music became a positive outlet for Merle Haggard. He taught himself to play guitar at the age of 12, playing along to old records of Lefty Frizzell and Bob Wills.

It wasn’t until a short stint locked up in San Quentin that completely shook Merle of his criminal ways. In need of money, Haggard was charged with robbery in Bakersfield, California. After attempting to escape from Bakersfield Jail, Haggard was transferred to San Quentin in 1957. A short time later in 1958, he attended a Johnny Cash concert. It was this concert that inspired Haggard to join the prison band and put focus into his music. “Rabbit”, a fellow inmate at San Quentin, recognized Haggard’s musical prowess and potential, and encouraged him to continue focusing on that career. And in 1960, Merle Haggard was released from San Quentin, right into the blossoming Bakersfield music scene.

Merle Haggard wound up playing bass for Wynn Stewart’s band in 1962. This opportunity led him to record his first songs, with “Sing a Sad Song” being released in 1964, reaching the top 20 on the charts. When his recording of “(My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers” hit the top 10, Merle caught the attention of Capitol Records, who help Merle become the defining country singer we all know him to be. It was the Liz and Casey Anderson penned “I’m A Lonesome Fugitive” that gave him his first number one single in 1967.

As Merle Haggard grew more comfortable in the spotlight, he opened up about his past life as a law-breaker and spending time in prison. He was no longer afraid that such details would result in negative reactions and drive fans away from his music. “Branded Man”, “Sing Me Back Home”, and “Mama Tried” were songs Merle wrote based on his past, and all three reached number one in the late 1960s.

In the midst of the Vietnam War and the protests in America, Merle Haggard became a political icon for the conservative right, for the people who hated the war protestors. What started off as a joke, “Okie from Muskogee” became an anthem for the way things used to be. Quickly followed by the rambunctious “The Fightin’ Side of Me,” Merle Haggard epitomized the American pride in country music, which is an attitude that hasn’t subsided to this day.

But it’s not just the political attitude that made Merle Haggard a country music icon. Merle Haggard wrote and recorded songs true to himself. Along with Buck Owens and others, Merle Haggard helped lead the Bakersfield Sound of country music into popularity; a sound developed in retaliation to the Nashville Sound. It was a music scene and style for those wanting freedom from the control of the establishment. From the late 60s through most of the 80s, Merle Haggard recorded 38 songs that made it to number one on the country charts, but that doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of what made Merle Haggard great.

Haggard persevered through hard times and made a name for himself without compromise. His music has influenced countless singers and songwriters to this day. And Merle Haggard never wavered or stopped recording until the very end. Just last year, Haggard, along with his long time friend Willie Nelson, recorded an album 14 new recordings, Django and Jimmie. It wasn’t until late last year that Merle had to start canceling concert dates due to coming down with pneumonia. It was that sickness that ultimately caused his death yesterday, April 6, 2016.

Merle Haggard was a man whose life was saved by his love for music. A man forgiven for his sins and praised for his accomplishments thereafter. An iconic singer and songwriter who valued sincerity in his music. Country music’s notoriety would not be the same if it weren’t for Merle Haggard. May he rest in peace, and may his music live forever.

Upcoming/Recent Country Music Releases

  • Hayes Carll‘s Lovers and Leavers will be released tomorrow.
  • Next week on April 15, Sturgill Simpson‘s A Sailor’s Guide To Earth will be released.
  • Del McCoury‘s Del and Woody will also be released on the 15th.
  • Michael Ray announced his new single will be “Think A Little Less.”
  • Jason Aldean‘s new single is called “Lights Come On.” Josh has a review on this coming soon.

Throwback Thursday Song

Merle Haggard’s “Sing Me Back Home” I’ll let the lyrics speak for themselves.

Non-Country Suggestion of the Week


Gareth Emery’s 100 Reasons to Live English EDM DJ Gareth Emery released a new album at the beginning of the month. I’m not a big fan of EDM music, but while exploring new releases, I checked out this album and found myself enjoying the production of the dance tunes. If you don’t listen to EDM, then my suggestion is to go listen to Merle Haggard.

Tweet of the Week

iTunes Review of the WeekScreen Shot 2016-04-06 at 7.18.33 PM

A review calling out Jason Aldean for his terrible music. I like this one!

The 58th Grammy Awards: Reactions to Country & Americana Nominations

Grammy

This morning (Dec. 12) the nominations for The 58th Grammy Awards taking place on February 15, 2016 were announced. A lot of country and Americana acts we’ve covered right here on Country Perspective were nominated. And I have to say my overall reaction is pretty positive. So enough pleasantries and let’s get to the nominations!

Album of the Year

  • Alabama Shakes – Sound & Color
  • Kendrick Lamar – To Pimp A Butterfly
  • Chris Stapleton – Traveller
  • Taylor Swift – 1989
  • The Weeknd – Beauty Behind The Madness 

Reaction: You’re reading that correctly: Chris Stapleton has indeed been nominated for Album of the Year, which after his sweep at the CMA Awards isn’t really surprising. I think he has a decent chance to win too. Remember at the 57th Grammy Awards Beck’s Morning Phase won Album of the Year against stiff competition, benefitting from votes being split amongst heavy hitters. But these heavy hitters this year are even more tough than last year. Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly is considered by many the best album of the year and even I can say that it’s better than Traveller. Then you have the most popular artist in all of music in Taylor Swift and The Weeknd who has been one of the most successful acts commercially and critically this year. Alabama Shakes is a true underdog here and would be the biggest upset.

Song of the Year 

  • Kendrick Lamar – “Alright”
  • Taylor Swift – “Blank Space”
  • Little Big Town – “Girl Crush”
  • Wiz Khalifa & Charlie Puth – “See You Again”
  • Ed Sheeran – “Thinking Out Loud”

Reaction: The success of “Girl Crush” continues to take Little Big Town to new heights. Radio was forced to embrace it after being accused of homophobia and the fact that this song has been huge commercially. But like Stapleton above this song faces really stiff competition and I would say at this moment it’s not going to win.

Best Country Solo Performance 

  • Cam – “Burning House”
  • Chris Stapleton – “Traveller”
  • Carrie Underwood – “Little Toy Guns”
  • Keith Urban – “John Cougar, John Deere, John 3:16”
  • Lee Ann Womack – “Chances Are”

Reaction: A very good group of nominations here, with the exception being Urban’s terrible song, which I give little chance of winning. I’m glad Womack continues to get recognition on the awards circuit, as she continues to make great music. Carrie may get snubbed on the country awards shows, but the Grammys love her and could win this. “Burning House” has been one of the hottest songs alongside “Girl Crush” and has a great chance to win this too.

Best Country Duo/Group Performance

  • Brothers Osborne – “Stay A Little Longer”
  • Joey + Rory – “If I Needed You”
  • Charles Kelley, Dierks Bentley & Eric Paslay – “The Driver”
  • Little Big Town – “Girl Crush”
  • Blake Shelton & Ashley Monroe – “Lonely Tonight”

Reaction: The sentimental favorite is hands down Joey + Rory’s “If I Needed You,” as Joey Feek revealed in October her cervical cancer is terminal and that she’s now living as long as she can. It’s a heartbreaking story and I have to admit I’m definitely pulling for them to win here. Although more importantly I hope Joey lives long enough to reach her goals of reaching Christmas 2015 and her daughter’s second birthday in February.

As for the other nominees, I’m surprised to see “The Driver” be nominated, as the song came out not too long ago. I guess they were that desperate for nominees here?

Best Country Song

  • Lee Ann Womack – “Chances Are”
  • Tim McGraw – “Diamond Rings & Old Barstools”
  • Little Big Town – “Girl Crush”
  • Brandy Clark – “Hold My Hand”
  • Chris Stapleton – “Traveller”

Reaction: I’d be happy with any of these songs winning, as they’re all quality in my eyes. It’d be cool to see the Hayes Carll-penned “Chances Are” to win and Brandy Clark’s “Hold My Hand” is a really underrated song that I’m glad is getting deserved recognition. “Diamond Rings & Old Barstools” was one of the best mainstream country songs of the past year. Like Carrie Underwood, Tim McGraw does better at the Grammys than the country awards shows.

Best Country Album

  • Sam Hunt – Montevallo
  • Little Big Town – Pain Killer 
  • Ashley Monroe – The Blade
  • Kacey Musgraves – Pageant Material
  • Chris Stapleton – Traveller

Reaction: For those worried about Sam Hunt and Little Big Town winning here, I’m going ease your fears: this is Stapleton’s award to lose. Really he could feasibly win most or all of the awards he’s nominated for (four in total). Glad to see The Blade get some love, but I don’t give it much of a chance of winning. The Grammys love Kacey Musgraves, so if Traveller doesn’t win I think Pageant Material does.

Best American Roots Performance 

  • Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn – “And Am I Born To Die”
  • Buddy Guy – “Born To Play Guitar”
  • The Milk Carton Kids – “City of Our Lady”
  • Punch Brothers – “Julep”
  • Mavis Staples – “See That My Grave Is Kept Clean”

Best American Roots Song

  • The Mavericks – “All Night Long”
  • Don Henley & Merle Haggard – “The Cost of Living”
  • Punch Brothers – “Julep”
  • Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell – “The Traveling Kind”
  • Jason Isbell – “24 Frames”

Reaction: Wow! What a group of songs. You have a little bit of everything here, from the Caribbean-flavored “All Night Long” to the poignant “24 Frames.” One of the best songs from Don Henley’s Cass County gets nominated in “The Cost of Living” and gives Merle a chance of a win. It’ll be interesting to see who wins this one, as I could see any of them winning.

Best Americana Album

  • Brandi Carlile – The Firewatcher’s Daughter
  • Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell – The Traveling Kind
  • Jason Isbell – Something More Than Free
  • The Mavericks – Mono
  • Punch Brothers – The Phosphorescent Blues

Reaction: Jason Isbell didn’t get screwed this time! For those unaware, his 2013 album Southeastern was snubbed by The Grammys and was one of the biggest gaffes in my opinion by The Grammys in recent memory. This time they didn’t forget him and he should be the favorite to win here.

What do you think of the nominations? Be sure to weigh in below.