Album Review – Miranda Lambert’s ‘The Weight of These Wings’

miranda-lambert-the-weight-of-these-wings

Making a great album is a tough challenge. Making a great double album, though? You’re taking on an almost impossible task that many of the best artists can’t even pull off. I’ve made my stance on album length quite clear, with simple math telling us that the longer an album is the more chances you have of making mistakes. The biggest challenge with taking on a double album is finding enough great content to fill it up from start to finish. Most artists can’t put together 10-12 track length album because writing songs is hard. So when I heard Miranda Lambert’s new album would be a double at 24 songs long, I was worried about it. While no doubt the heartbreak and turmoil she’s experienced over the last couple years while also beginning a new chapter of her life would certainly give plenty of inspiration, I was skeptical if she could find enough for a double album. There would undoubtedly be great songs on it, but there could also be ample bad songs that could drag the good down. Not to mention I’ve lost track of how many different albums from major labels have been wrecked by bad production choices. On the flip side the names involved with the project inspires a lot of positive thinking. So with all of this in mind I dug deep into the mammoth-sized double album, The Weight of These Wings.

The album is broken into two 12 song parts, with the first part being called The Nerve and the second part being called The Heart. I’m going to review the first 12 songs together first and the second set after because this is how the album is intended to be listened. The ominous “Runnin’ Just In Case” opens it up and sets the tone for the album perfectly. Written by Lambert and Gwen Sebastian (who is part of writing some of the best songs on the album), the song is about running from the pain of love or love itself, not exactly sure of which it really is. What really captivates me is the raw emotion on display from Miranda, something that happens a lot on this album.

The decidedly upbeat “Highway Vagabond” is bound to be a future single and I’m surprised it wasn’t the follow-up to “Vice.” While the nature of the song is kind of kitschy, it’s also fun-loving and doesn’t take itself seriously, which is why I think many have already gravitated towards it. The album’s second single “We Should Be Friends” is another upbeat song, which Lambert wrote entirely herself. It’s a clever song about Lambert identifying who she has a friend in, from the frankly honest to the heartbroken. She keeps the song simple and it works. I’m not sure if country radio will get behind it though. I have to say I’m glad there are some upbeat songs on this double album because if it were just entirely heartbreak and dark songs it would be a draining listen. Also by having some lighter songs it acts as a great contrast and helps the darker songs stand out even more.

Lambert sings of helping a friend get out of a bad relationship in “Getaway Driver.” Written with Hemby and her boyfriend/Americana artist Anderson East, it’s a somber Bonnie & Clyde type song. Instead of gleefully riding into the sunset guns a blazing like in the movies, we get something real. Lambert duets with East on “Pushin’ Time.” It’s a song about falling in love, which I imagine is based on these two falling in love. Even if you had no clue these two were together when you listen to this song, you can feel the genuineness and love shine through in every aspect of the song. The steel guitar work by Spencer Cullum goes fantastically with the lyrics. This is hands-down one of the best songs of the album.

The Muscle Shoals-influenced “Covered Wagon” is one of those feel good songs that’s easy to sing along with. “Ugly Lights” sees Lambert incorporating a garage country like sound that Aubrie Sellers really brought to light with her debut album. It really suits both Lambert and the song, which is a sort of gritty and dark tune about hiding in a bar with your broken heart. The lyrics do an even better job of capturing this feeling, which doesn’t surprise me considering Lambert wrote it with Natalie Hemby and Liz Rose. The bluegrass-tinged “You Wouldn’t Know Me” speaks to the truth of not knowing a person just by asking them how they’re doing. A person can change everyday, so you really don’t know someone. It’s one of the simpler, more overlooked songs of the album, but it’s definitely one of my favorites on The Nerve.

There’s a couple of songs on The Nerve that get away from this simplicity and make things too complicated. “Smoking Jacket” is a straight up sex song. This itself isn’t bad; I’m just calling a spade a spade. What else can be gleaned from the line, “every night he makes his magic on me”? That being said this song just doesn’t do much for me, perhaps due to it being too long. One of my least favorites of the album and the worst on The Nerve is “Pink Sunglasses.” The production on this song is just way overdone and self-indulgent. Not to mention the song feels like it drags. It feels like six minutes when it’s only four. This all takes away from the theme of the song, which centers on the sentimental value and confidence one can gain from simple objects.

The final track of The Nerve is “Use My Heart,” which serves as the perfect transition into The Heart. The reason being is the song revolves around the phrase of “I don’t have the nerve to use my heart.” To boot it’s a great song, as Lambert sings of dealing with the inner demons of trying to move on and reconcile with what has happened. Lambert wrote the song with Ashley Monroe and Waylon Payne. I point this out because this is one of two songs this specific troika wrote on the album and both songs are excellent.

Kicking off The Heart is “Tin Man,” probably the most heartbreaking song of the album. It’s about Lambert and the tin man of the Wizard of Oz, who famously always wanted a heart, discussing the merits of having one. She explains to him how he doesn’t know what kind of pain he’s asking for when he asks for a heart and it’s not worth the trouble. By the end of the song she offers to trade her heart, which is shattered into pieces and covered in scars, to him in exchange for his armor. Written by Lambert and Jack Ingram (who is quite proficient in the art of writing about heartbreak), this is one of the best songs I’ve ever heard from Lambert.

Lambert’s sassy happiness shines through on “For The Birds.” It symbolizes her re-awakening so to speak after her breakup, wanting happiness and sunshine back after going through so much darkness. It’s finally finding that light at the end of a long tunnel. “Good Ol’ Days” is about Lambert willing to go back to where it all began for her to rediscover herself and her truth. It’s about re-examining everything and figuring out just where to go from where you’re at currently. The song does a great job of capturing the humility of the subject, which doesn’t surprise me because Brent Cobb and Adam Hood wrote the song with Lambert. “Tomboy” is a personal anthem from Lambert about her and everyone like her. She’s a proud tomboy who does it her way and this is her way of telling young girls it’s cool to be this way too. For this reason I think this would be a great choice for a single.

If you feel like you need more steel guitar in your life, just listen to “Things That Break” and “Well-Rested.” It’s as thick and infectious as molasses on each song. These are classic heartbreak country songs in every sense. There are a lot of great songs I enjoy on this album, but if I had to pick the best one on this expansive double album it would have to be “To Learn Her.” Written by the praised above troika of Lambert, Monroe and Payne, this song is pure country music. If you asked me to define country music, I would point to a song like this one. The heavy steel guitar makes me smile from ear-to-ear. This song is Lambert at her very best.

The other songwriting trio I absolutely enjoy on this album is Lambert, Hemby and Rose, who get their shining moment on “Keeper of the Flame. “ I didn’t even have to look at the credits to know these three wrote this because their fingerprints are all over it. The very best of these three come together to create this soaring love anthem that you just want to listen to over and over again. I even surprisingly enjoy the synthesizer on this song, which gives the song some real energy and urgency. “Bad Boy” is the weakest track of The Heart, but even it isn’t a bad song. It’s the fact that rest of it is so strong that a just solid song doesn’t quite stand out. While the song relies on the predictable trope of falling in love with the bad boy, I really enjoy the instrumentation. The song starts off with a harder rock edge before giving away to twang pedal steel guitar towards the end.

I really applaud Miranda for going completely outside the box on “Six Degrees of Separation.” I love it when an artist tries something completely different and takes risks and this song is a perfect example of why. The vocal layering combined with the grungy guitars and snappy lyrics make for an infectiously great song. Lambert’s ode to the sun “Dear Old Sun” shows a more subdued soulful side of her. It’s probably the most spiritual Lambert gets on the entire album, as you can really feel the heart in her voice as she sings. Then again Lambert bared her entire self in every part of this album.

The Weight of These Wings closes it’s story with “I’ve Got Wheels.” It’s where Lambert finally moves on from her demons. As she sings, she’s got wheels and now she’s using them to get away from the heartbreak that haunted her for so long. It’s that sobering feeling that you’ve finally picked up all of the pieces and can move on with your life to something after being consumed by something old for so long. And that itself is another chapter that won’t be easy, but Lambert at least knows she’s moving forward now.

After thoroughly listening to The Weight of These Wings from front to back and over again several times, Lambert accomplished something I’ve seen for the first time while running Country Perspective and that’s releasing a great double album. This is an amazing accomplishment that should make her proud because this is nothing to scoff at. If I had to pick the best side, it would definitely be The Heart. There’s not a single bad song on this part of the album, while The Nerve is hampered by the only three missteps of the entire album.

Lambert put every bit of her talent into this album; there was no holding back from her. She utilized some of the best songwriters in country music today, while also showing off her own songwriting chops. We not only get to see her at her most country, but she even takes some risks and pulls them off well too. Frank Liddell, Eric Masse and Glenn Worff for the most part did a great job producing this album and not falling into the usual mainstream pitfalls. Miranda Lambert did something many artists have trouble with and that’s channeling pure, raw energy into beautiful art. The Weight of These Wings is arguably the crowning jewel of Lambert’s entire career.

Grade: 9/10

 

Recommend? – Yes!

Album Highlights: Tin Man, To Learn Her, Ugly Lights, Runnin’ Just in Case, Vice, Pushin’ Time, Use My Heart, Good Ol’ Days, For The Birds, Six Degrees of Separation, I’ve Got Wheels

Bad Songs: Pink Sunglasses & Smoking Jacket

Wallpaper: None


The Past Pulse Of Mainstream Country Music [March 2008]

carnival_ride_-_album

This is the Past Pulse Of Mainstream Country Music. Each week, I take a look at the Billboard Country  Airplay Chart from years ago and grade the top 30 songs. Each week will be a different year. The grading format I use each week is every song will receive one of the following scores: +5, +4, +3, +2, +1, 0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5. These will then be tallied up for an overall score, or pulse of the past top 30 songs, with the highest possible score being a +150 and the lowest possible score being a -150. The grade I would give it determines its Pulse score. The grading key: 10 [+5], 9[+4], 8[+3], 7[+2], 6[+1], 5[0], 4[-1], 3[-2], 2[-3], 1[-4], 0[-5].

The goal of this exercise is to evaluate the past pulse of mainstream country music and determine if it was better or worse compared to now. To see the full list of the top 30 country airplay songs for this week, click here. This week I will take a look at the top 30 songs of the Billboard Country Airplay Chart from March 15th, 2008.

  1. Carrie Underwood – “All American Girl” +1 (Cliché, but the sound and vocals are good)
  2. Rodney Atkins – “Cleaning This Gun (Come On In Boy)” 0
  3. Alan Jackson – “Small Town Southern Man” +4 (One of his best in my opinion)
  4. Kenny Chesney & George Strait – “Shiftwork” 0
  5. Chuck Wicks – “Stealing Cinderella” +1 (cheesy as all hell, but it’s played with enough sincerity to work for me)
  6. Trace Adkins – “You’re Gonna Miss This” +4
  7. Gary Allan – “Watching Airplanes” +2
  8. George Strait – “I Saw God Today” +4
  9. Chris Cagle – “What Kinda Gone” +2
  10. Jason Aldean – “Laughed Until We Cried” +3 (Yeah, a positive Aldean score. I’m as shocked as you all are)
  11. Brooks & Dunn – “God Must be Busy” +2
  12. James Otto – “Just Got Started Lovin’ You” 0 (Eh…)
  13. Taylor Swift – “Picture To Burn” +1
  14. Phil Vassar – “Love Is A Beautiful Thing” +1 (Cheesy as all hell, but at least it sort of incorporates a story)
  15. Bucky Covington – “It’s Good To Be Us” -1
  16. Lady Antebellum – “Love Don’t Live Here” +3
  17. Kellie Pickler – “Things That Never Cross A Man’s Mind” +1
  18. Joe Nichols – “It Ain’t No Crime” +1
  19. Jewel – “Stronger Woman” -1 [Worst Song] (Man, never heard a song by here before. Don’t care for her voice at all. Plus the song is too preachy for me. Sorry)
  20. Jake Owen – “Somethin’ Bout A Woman” 0
  21. Dierks Bentley – “Trying To Stop Your Leaving” +3
  22. Josh Turner & Trisha Yearwood – “Another Try” +4 [Best Song]
  23. Garth Brooks & Huey Lewis – “Workin’ For A Livin'” +2 (Yes, I’ve heard this Garth song)
  24. Ashton Shepherd – “Takin’ Off This Pain” +2
  25. Jack Ingram – “Maybe She’ll Get Lonely” 0
  26. Rascal Flatts – “Every Day” -1
  27. Brad Paisley – “I’m Still A Guy” +2
  28. Montgomery Gentry – “Back When I Knew It All” +3
  29. Josh Gracin – “We Weren’t Crazy” +2 (Yes, people on country radio used to sing from the perspective of ONCE being young instead of pretending they’re still young…)
  30. The Eagles – “Busy Being Fabulous” 0

The Past Pulse Of Mainstream Country Music: +45

So yeah this kind of a weird week. On one hand, there’s a plethora of great songs. Even compared to some charts in the 90’s I’d say there’s more good songs here. In other words, quantity versus quality. In fact, picking the best song was absolutely brutal.

The problem is that there’s also a lot of mediocrity here. Nothing inherently terrible or anything, but there are too many songs that play it safe here and don’t really stand out that much. Still this is a damn good week. I’m happy with the results.

As always, if you have any questions as to why I gave a song a certain grade feel free to ask me. Also, let me know what you guys think of the chart in the comments!

Album Review – Jack Ingram’s ‘Midnight Motel’

jack-ingram-midnight-motel

Whenever an artist goes on an extended hiatus from releasing new music, it’s not something that’s really noticed at first. You just assume they’re going to keep releasing music at the same pace they always have. Then more time passes and you start to notice it more and more. All of the sudden five years have passed and now you’re chomping at the bit to hear from them again. That’s the certainly the case with Jack Ingram, who’s last album was released in 2009 on Big Machine Records. A lot has happened in seven years, as Ingram left Nashville to head back to Texas where it all began for him. Like many Texas artists who try their hand on Music Row, it only takes a couple tastes of major labels in Nashville before you’re ready to get back to making the music you want. That’s the certainly the case with Ingram and his new highly anticipated album Midnight Motel. You can tell this is the exact album he wanted to make. I found this is for the better and the worse.

Midnight Motel opens up with “Old Motel.” The song is about love, with an old hotel representing this love. It can stand the test of time or it can be burnt to the ground when it’s gone. It’s a solid song that could have been better if the theme was expanded upon further. There’s also an acoustic version at the end of the album that I think sounds better. This is followed by “It’s Always Gonna Rain,” a ballad about hope. The song goes into detail about Ingram’s father and grandfather looking up the sky just like him, dreaming and praying for better days. But they also know there’s always going to be rain in life too. You deal with the bad hands dealt in hopes of a good one coming soon. It’s one of the most realistic inspiration songs I’ve heard in a while.

“I Feel Like Drinking Tonight” sees Ingram tackling demons and the unfairness of life. Ingram though sees the best way to get through your problems is sitting at the bar and drinking your sorrows away. The gritty guitar play makes for a great backdrop to the theme of this song. Perhaps the standout track of Midnight Motel is “Blaine’s Ferris Wheel.” The melancholy tune seems like the most talked about song of the album and for good reason. It’s about a promoter and friend of Ingram named Blaine, whose venue was in San Angelo, Texas. If you listen to the version of the album where Ingram talks about the inspiration of this song, he tells a story about Merle Haggard backing out of a gig at Blaine’s venue and getting Ingram to fill in. The song goes much deeper on many levels and you can hear this just in Ingram’s voice as he sings. This is one of those songs where you just need to hear it for yourself to appreciate.

The piano-driven “Nothing To Fix” is a song about learning lessons the hard way. It’s also about how if you’re not broken you can’t be fixed. If this sounds vague, then you’re correct. This song doesn’t really do anything to give these themes a meaning, no matter how well-meaning. The instrumentation though is quite good. Up next is “What’s A Boy To Do,” a breakup song. A man searches for the words he needs to say to win his ex back and make up for what he did to make her cry. Of course he really can’t and is left wondering what if as his love is now gone. It’s a solid, yet unspectacular take on losing love. “Trying” is one song that Ingram absolutely nails on this album. It explores the fears of dying, both literally and figuratively. A man dreams of dying, but wakes up to find he’s in an unhappy relationship and left saying he’s trying his best. It’s one of many moments on the album where the listeners have to search a little to find what the song has to say.

If I had to pick the most cliché song on the album, it would have to be “Champion Of The World.” The song is about a man always feeling like a screw up in life and being looked down upon by everyone; that is until he found his wife who makes him feel like a champion of the world. It’s a well-meaning song, but I’ve heard it so much before that it doesn’t really make much of an impact on me. The most upbeat song on the mostly downbeat Midnight Motel is easily “I’m Drinking Through It.” It’s one of those venting drinking songs you’ll be singing along with the moment you first hear it. After all we all have problems and lot of people get through it by drinking through it. This is probably one of my favorites on the album and also one of the few songs on it to have an infectious hook to it.

“Can’t Get Any Better Than This” suffers from the same thing that holds down “Nothing To Fix” too. It’s a vague song about appreciating what you have and realizing you can’t have life any better than what it is in front of you. It’s a feel good song and that’s all I have to say about it. One of the final songs on Midnight Motel is “All Over Again.” It’s sort of a nice bow on the whole album, as it goes through a little bit of everything that is explored on the album: life being unfair, making mistakes, love and dealing with it all. It’s all well and good and there’s nothing dishonest about the lyrics. It’s about the most honest take as you can find on this crazy thing called life.

Ultimately I found Jack Ingram’s Midnight Motel to be an album I just like and respect for what it strives to accomplish, but I wanted to love and enjoy it. There are moments on this album where I think the latter will happen, but it’s weighed down by a lot of songs that are just sort of there for me. It’s kind of hard to describe what exactly this album lacks. I guess I would say it’s purpose because a lot of the songs don’t do enough to really make me connect with them and rely on the listener to make it work. It just feels like an album that Ingram and his inner circle will get, but the rest of us are kind of scratching our heads trying to figure out. I would go so far to say this album gets too personal and almost forgets about the listener on the other end. This is a situation where a good producer would step in and bring some restraint to the album in this regard. In order for these gut-wrenching, personal songs to work, they have to try to form some sort of connection with the listener and this album fails to do this in multiple instances on the album. The instrumentation feels like an afterthought at times on this album too. It could really helped make some of these songs stand out better. I know this probably won’t be a popular review, especially amongst Ingram fans. But it’s hard not to express I was left wanting more. Midnight Motel is basically a 180 degree turn in comparison to Ingram’s last two albums, but not necessarily for the best.

Grade: 7/10

The Hodgepodge: Country Radio’s 15 Minutes of Fame Strategy

This week’s opening will be short. I just started a new job this week so I haven’t had a ton of time to thoroughly think through this topic, but it’s something I want to dive into and would love to see readers’ thoughts on this.

Mainstream country labels seems to aim more and more for just one hit single. For all the radio hype Chris Lane got for “Fix,” his album sales tell a different story. Girl Problems hasn’t sold well out of the gate, debuting at #8 on Billboard last week and falling off the charts this week. Outselling Lane last week was Texas Country star Cody Johnson, who still remains on the charts this week. And Cody Jinks, who debuted at #4 this week with I’m Not the Devil sold more than Girl Problems did.

It’s not really breaking news that independent country stars have strong album sales, as we saw last year with Aaron Watson, Jason Isbell, Blackberry Smoke, and Turnpike Troubadours all reaching number one on the album charts. A main reason for this could be the fact that independent fan bases seem more willing to purchase an album to support their favorite artist. But being able to sell an album well, especially at the heels of a hit radio song, could signify the longevity for an artist. Yes, Cody Johnson and Cody Jinks have established careers and released multiple albums prior to Gotta Be Me and I’m Not the Devil, but strong album sales only cement their place with their fans and in the music industry.

However, with Chris Lane selling poorly after “Fix” hit number one just screams one-hit wonder. So many times, we see artists, particularly trend-chasing B/C-level artists, only perform well at radio with a song or two. Most albums seem to get delayed, or they simply just sell like crap. How do Chris Lane or Big Loud Records expect to see any follow-up success? Not that I want to hear another full-fledged pop song from Lane, but why wasn’t Girl Problems given the same type of promotion as “Fix”? I just don’t understand why they chose to play the short game for 15 minutes of fame. Chris Lane isn’t the first, and he won’t be the last. This is just one of many, many problems with mainstream country radio.

Country radio is in the pits, and these hot, one-hit wonder type songs is a short-sighted attempt to gain listeners and revenue. Labels and radio execs aren’t thinking of the long game to improve and crawl out of its self-dug hole. I don’t claim to be a programming expert, but this type of strategy screams short-term thinking. It’s treading on water without looking for a boat to help stay afloat. And as long as radio continues this thought process, we’ll be continually treated to trendy singles followed by poor albums. Artists and labels who think solely about the one single and not the album are not building a sustainable music career.

Upcoming/Recent Country and Americana Releases

  • Jack Ingram‘s Midnight Motel will be released tomorrow.
  • Whiskey Myers’ newest album, Mud will be released September 9.
  • Also coming out on the 9th is St. Paul & The Broken Bones‘ Sea of Noise.
  • Amanda Shires will release her new album My Piece of Land on September 16.
  • Erik Dylan‘s Heart of a Flatland Boy will be released on October 21.
  • Mack McKenzie is releasing his sophomore album A Million Miles on October 22.

Throwback Thursday Song

Merle Haggard’s “My Favorite Memory” This single from Haggard was released on this day in 1981, and would go on to become Merle’s 25th number one single.

Non-Country Suggestion of the Week

Frank Ocean Blonde In an act of defiance against the major labels and streaming, Frank Ocean left his label and self-released his highly anticipated sophomore album exclusively through Apple. With labels/streaming services/artists all at odds, this kind of move is big and could lead to more artists acting in the same fashion.

Tweet of the Week

It’s been a big week for Erik Dylan, who performed at this Guy Clark tribute with the likes of Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris, Vince Gill, and others. Dylan’s upcoming album was also made available for pre-order.

iTunes Review for Florida Georgia Line

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 10.29.54 PM

This was left under Florida Georgia Line’s Dig Your Roots, which is due out tomorrow. I’ve only heard “H.O.L.Y.” and “God, Your Mama, and Me,” but I haven’t been crazy about either song. This review says it all!

The Past Pulse Of Mainstream Country Music [January 2009]

488_front

This is the past pulse of mainstream country music. Each week, I take a look at the Billboard Country Airplay Chart (or, “Hot Country Songs” as it used to be called) from years ago and grade the top 30 songs. Each week will be a different year. The grading format I use each week is every song will receive one of the following scores: +5, +4, +3, +2, +1, 0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5. These will then be tallied up for an overall score, or pulse of the past top thirty country songs, with the highest possible score being a +150 and the lowest possible score being a -150. The grade I would give it determines its Pulse score. The grading key: 10 [+5], 9 [+4], 8 [+3], 7 [+2], 6 [+1], 5 [0], 4 [-1], 3 [-2], 2 [-3], 1 [-4], 0 [-5].

The goal of this exercise is to evaluate the past state of mainstream country music and determine if it was better or worse compared to now. To see the full list of the top 30 country airplay songs for this week, click here. While I did wish to go back even further in time with our past pulse, I unfortunately ran into time constraints. Therefore, we will look at a more recent time in country music history. This week I will take a look at the top 30 songs of the Billboard Hot Country Songs from January 3rd, 2009.

  1. Rascal Flatts – “Here” 0
  2. Montgomery Gentry – “Roll With Me” +3
  3. Sugarland – “Already Gone” +3
  4. Zac Brown Band – “Chicken Fried” 0 (At least it launched their career and showed they had better songs. Oh wait, hello “Beautiful Drug”…)
  5. Brad Paisley & Keith Urban – “Start A Band” +3
  6. Alan Jackson – “Country Boy” -1 (I hate giving Alan a negative score but fair is fair)
  7. Billy Currington – “Don’t” -2 (For country. As a whole, I actually somewhat like this)
  8. Dierks Bentley – “Feel That Fire” 0
  9. Jamey Johnson – “In Color” +5 [Best Song]
  10. Blake Shelton – “She Wouldn’t Be Gone” +3 (One of the last songs I would grade as a positive for Blake)
  11. Toby Keith – “God Love Her” +3 
  12. Keith Urban – “Sweet Thing” -3 [Worst Song]
  13. Kenny Chesney & Mac McAnally – “Down The Road” +4
  14. Brooks & Dunn – “Cowgirls Don’t Cry” +2 (Was I the only one who liked this?)
  15. Lady Antebellum – “Lookin’ For A Good Time” -2
  16. George Strait – “River Of Love” +2 (See Brooks & Dunn)
  17. Randy Houser – “Anything Goes” +4 (Now he’s talking about kicking up dust in the mud or some shit like that)
  18. Pat Green – “Let Me” 0
  19. Taylor Swift – “White Horse” +3 (Prepare the pitchforks folks. I’m ready.)
  20. Darius Rucker – “It Won’t Be Like This For Long” +3
  21. Lee Ann Womack – “Last Call” +3
  22. Jake Owen – “Don’t Think I Can’t Love You” +1 (Docking points for not being overtly country, although I do like this)
  23. Jack Ingram – “That’s A Man” 0 (Too cliché)
  24. Miranda Lambert – “More Like Her” +2
  25. Josh Turner – “Everything Is Fine” +3
  26. Martina McBride – “Ride” 0
  27. Rodney Atkins – “It’s America” 0
  28. Jimmy Wayne – “I Will” -1
  29. Gary Allan – “She’s So California” 0
  30. Eli Young Band – “Always The Love Songs” +1

The Past Pulse Of Mainstream Country Music: +39

Not a bad chart at all. In fact, quite a lot of good stuff here. Jamey Johnson, Lee Ann Womack, Josh Turner, Alan Jackson, Brooks & Dunn, and George Strait were all still on the radio and we actually have a +5 song with “In Color.” Perhaps I’m being a bit generous with that top score but I truly do think it deserves it. Even the worst song here (“Sweet Thing”) would still only be one of the worst on the modern-day charts instead of the lowest we could go. All in all, a solid top thirty.

As always, if you have any questions as to why I gave a song a certain grade feel free to ask me. Also, let me know what you guys think of the chart in the comments!