Country Perspective’s Top 10 Albums of 2019

Back in the day, Country Perspective would spend around a month doing end of the year posts, recognizing the best and worst across several categories. While it was fun in a way, it was also quite tiring. And I imagine it had to be quite tiring for the reader too. After all I imagine you read several other music blogs and year-end posts. Speaking also as a reader of many blogs, it gets old after reading so many of these posts when really these things have two major points: 1) Giving proper recognition to the absolute best in music and 2) Giving you the listener a potential new album/artist to listen to. Plus, it’s fun to compare lists.

So with my lack of interest in doing so many year end posts and this blog having it’s major focus on albums, this is going to be the only best of 2019 post, the best albums of the year. It was a pretty good year for albums, as there were so many good ones across multiple genres. While there were some disappointments that stood out for me, pleasant new surprises more than made up for them (you’ll see some of them made the top 10 even). While it certainly didn’t touch the best years of this decade (hello 2014), 2019 is one of the better years of music in the 2010s (I’ll be doing my best of the decade posts in 2020).

But before I get to my top ten albums of 2019, I want to list some honorable mentions that weren’t quite good enough for the top ten, but still good albums that I recommend you check out…

Honorable Mentions

Country Perspective’s Top 10 Albums of 2019

10. Benny The Butcher – The Plugs I Met

Dirty, grimy and nasty is how I would describe the sounds and lyrics of this album. And I love it! The entire Griselda hip-hop collective is fantastic and rightly getting their due now that they’re signed to Eminem’s Shady Records (check out the album they dropped in November). But the star is undoubtedly Benny The Butcher and this album is the proof. All of his work is great, but this is an excellent entry point. When the king of coke rap in Pusha T endorses your coke rap (dropping a great feature on this album too), well you know you’re doing something right.

9. Cody Jinks – The Wanting

While I wouldn’t put the The Wanting as Cody Jinks’ best work, it’s certainly close and features maybe the most badass album cover of 2019. This album offers deep introspection on life, passion and love. The instrumentation is varied, going from slow ballads to rockers. And he did this all while dropping another album the week before that just missed this list. Jinks is undoubtedly one of the hardest working artists in music today and I was impressed by what he accomplished in dropping two great albums within a week of each other. If you’re someone looking to get into country music, Jinks is one of the first you should check out.

8. Dee White – Southern Gentleman

This album was released all the way back in January, but you should not forget about it. Dee White proves himself to be one of the most promising new country artists to watch with his debut album Southern Gentleman. White’s voice evokes memories of Roy Orbison and George Jones and he’s only 19-years-old. And while he feels like a classic artist in every sense, his lyrics are still modern. There are several great storytelling moments on this album and White even holds his own with fantastic vocalists like Ashley McBryde and Alison Krauss. I can’t wait to hear more from Dee White.

7. Tyler Childers – Country Squire

Country Squire is an incredible album and with its perfectly short run time, you’ll find yourself replaying it again and again. While some were disappointed by this follow-up to Purgatory, I was instantly impressed with this album. What’s great is these are old songs that have been played by Childers live for years and with live music being what pays the bills for artists, it only makes sense to record these songs. While we’re still due for Tyler Childers’ absolute best work, this is a pretty damn good album to play while we wait for it.

6. Michaela Anne – Desert Dove

Michaela Anne delivers an amazing album in Desert Dove. It’s full of smooth and breezy songs that only take a couple of listens to truly enjoy. Like my good friend and fellow music writer Zackary Kephart says, this album is quite similar to Kacey Musgraves’ Golden Hour and that was my top album of 2018. So if you enjoyed that album, this is a must-listen. This also feels like Anne’s breakout moment, as she finds the sound and themes she needed to truly show her full potential and prove herself as an artist that should be on your radar if you love country music or just great music in general.

5. Kishi Bash – Omoiyari

Omoiyari is a wonderful album full of beautiful lyrics and sounds that cover an important topic in American history that more people show know about. Why Kishi Bashi is not more covered by music journalists I’ll never know, but this music reviewer is telling you that you need to check him out. He’s a multi-instrumentalist who writes his own lyrics and can cover a wide variety of sounds so damn well. On this album he masters the chamber pop/orchestral pop sound while giving you an informative history lesson too. As a music nerd and history nerd, it’s a double win!

4. Mike and The Moonpies – Cheap Silver and Solid Country Gold

So I would be remiss if I didn’t point that my top four is clearly ahead of the rest, being that they all received 10/10 ratings, with each at one point or another getting consideration for Country Perspective’s 2019 Album of the Year. And out of all them, this was my biggest surprise of 2019. Mike and the Moonpies deliver something special with Cheap Silver and Solid Country Gold. It’s fantastic in both sound and songwriting. The group clearly left their comfort zone. It honors the tried and true, while delivering something that feels new too. This is a band for me that went from releasing two albums I couldn’t get into at all to releasing an album that I can’t find a single fault in.

3. Freddie Gibbs & Madlib – Bandana 

I found hip-hop in 2019 to be pretty disappointing. But I never find the work of Freddie Gibbs and producer Madlib to be disappointing, as this duo once again delivers big with Bandana. After delivering a classic in Piñata, they manage to nearly match it, which absolutely blows my mind. Gibbs raps his ass off on this album, delivering some of his best bars ever, while finding a great balance of bangers and humor while also offering introspection on more serious topics like when he was falsely accused of rape and systematic racism. Madlib brings some of the best beats in the game, picking some excellent samples as he always does. If there’s one hip-hop album you listen to this year, it’s this one.

2. Sturgill Simpson – SOUND & FURY

SOUND & FURY from start to finish feels like one long song, as it’s both cohesive in sound and lyrics, telling several stories that tie into overarching theme of Simpson being angry at a lot of things in the world, but when it comes down to it he’s most angry at himself and what he let himself become. Each track explores the flawed thoughts and actions of a flawed man. This album sounds like early to mid 70s music and sounds like the eccentric, frenetic sounds of Jeff Lyne and Electric Light Orchestra meets the in-your-face, sneering lyrics of Creedence Clearwater Revival. The amount of care and detail given to every aspect makes this one of the best albums you’ll hear in 2019 and yet another excellent album from Sturgill Simpson.

Country Perspective’s 2019 Album of the Year…

1. Carly Rae Jepsen – Dedicated

If you still think of Carly Rae Jepsen as just the “Call Me Maybe” girl, well you’re just plain wrong. Because when she released Emotion and Emotion Side B, she showed me that there’s not a better pop artist making music today. Jepsen further proves with Dedicated that she just gets pop music: the over-the-top production, the overwhelming emotions, the catchy hooks, exciting themes and everything in-between. It’s appropriate she has an album named Dedicated considering she writes hundreds of songs for each album and spends months culling down to the final track list. This true dedication to her music shines through on every lyric and sound on this album. It’s a complete album from front to back, touching on the several emotions of love through the many trials and tribulations of a relationship. And it wouldn’t surprise me a bit that the “B cuts” for this album are equally as great in quality. Not only is this the best album of 2019 in my mind, but one of the best of the 2010s.


Thanks for reading! Be sure to weigh in with your thoughts on Country Perspective’s Top 10 Albums of 2019 below and feel free to offer your own list. Also feel free to ask me about any music releases/news from 2019 too (think of it as a 2019 music AMA), as my late start didn’t allow me to discuss everything I would have liked to discuss.

Album Review — Freddie Gibbs & Madlib’s ‘Bandana’

The last time Freddie Gibbs and Madlib teamed up for an album, they delivered a stone-cold classic in Piñata. So expectations were sky high for Bandana and while it’s not quite as great as Piñata, it comes pretty damn close. From front to back this album is full of bangers, bars and beats that constantly leave you coming back for more.

Opening tracks “Obrigado” and “Freestyle Shit” establish the humor and grittiness that you’re accustomed to hearing in a Gibbs album. “Half Manne Half Cocaine” is a bit of a departure from the usual for Gibbs and Madlib with its heavily trap influenced sound, but you wouldn’t know it with Gibbs’ flawless flow over the beat.

“Crime Pays” is more in line from what you expect from the duo and it’s definitely one of the standouts on the album. Everything about this track is smooth and it’s one of many moments on the album that shows how Gibbs just continues to improve both his technical rapping skills and his bars. “Massage Seats” is a fun banger that features some of my favorite bars (“Golden State, the roster, my garage deep” and “Big baller, father, you my son like Lonzo”).

When looking at the track list, “Palmolive” immediately stands out with its A-list features of Pusha T and Killer Mike. And it goes just as hard you expect with these three on a song, with a perfectly nasty sound. But I would be remiss if I didn’t say there are two disappointments with this song: Freddie’s unfortunate anti-vax bar and Killer Mike not getting a verse. Pusha T however absolutely destroys his verse and it continues a year in which he’s delivered some of the best features in hip hop. I also love the stand-up interlude at the end, as it’s classic Gibbs humor.

“Fake Names” goes into the dark and gritty details of Gibbs’ experience of dealing cocaine and the relationships and the greed of the parties involved. While it’s most definitely a banger, Gibbs also does an excellent job displaying his storytelling chops with all of the intricacies the songs covers. It’s Gibbs at this best at what he raps about best. “Flat Tummy Tea” is another fun song and it sounds so much better within the album compared to when it was first released as a standalone single.

“Situations” is my favorite of the album and it’s because of the smooth, yet frenetic delivery from Gibbs and the grimy production from Madlib. Everything just goes together so well on this track and you just get slapped in the face with bars (my favorite being “Motherfuck Jeff Sessions, I’m sellin’ dope with a weapon”). Gibbs comes through with another great interlude on this song too, this time the funny and insightful cussing pastor.

“Giannis” sees Gibbs dropping great bars about everything, from watching Dora the Explorer with his daughter and then getting right back to making dope to calling out rappers getting screwed on 360 deals. Anderson .Paak comes through with a really nice feature and fits over the production well with his delivery. “Practice” is one of the most introspective songs Gibbs has ever done, as it examines how he treats his loved ones and having to change his ways for them. It’s really nice to see and further proof to those who unfairly dismiss him as just a coke bar rapper.

“Cataracts” is an awesome banger and another standout on the album. “I’m chillin’ in my old school, Chevy thang, Cadillac/Smokin’ on that good, good/Good for my cataracts” is one of the best bars on the album, with its catchy wordplay and flawless delivery from Gibbs. “Gat Damn” is one of the more overlooked tracks, but it’s grown on me with more listens and I’m enjoying it more. I think a lot of people will overlook that the song revolves around Gibbs reflecting on his time in jail for being falsely accused of rape and gets more introspective than you realize. It’s also a different flow from a lot of the album and showcases yet another side of Gibbs’ abilities.

“Education” is a song I feel I can’t really do justice because it not only covers so many important topics, but the amount of amazing lyricism from Yasiin Bey, Black Thought and Gibbs is something you just have to hear for yourself. To me this is the type of song you play for people who thumb their nose down on hip hop and say hip hop artists can’t pen serious lyrics like other genres.

The album’s closing song “Soul Right” is Gibbs reflecting on his lifestyle and his choices, and while he realizes he’s made mistakes, he still hopes for forgiveness from God and to get his soul right with him. The dichotomy of the immorality of his actions and the justification of them in the name of injustice and making ends meet is explored throughout the album and so it’s perfect that it ends with him striving for an inner peace after years of grinding to where he’s at now.

Once again Freddie Gibbs and Madlib deliver big, as Bandana is probably not only the best album you’ll hear in hip hop this year, but one of the best albums you’ll hear out of all genres.

Grade: 10/10