Spinning All The Records — April/May 2020

Hey all! So I wanted to give a quick update on the plans for the site moving forward and what’s been happening. First I wanted to address the abrupt stop in posts. The reason for this was due to a privacy issue that I would chalk more up to trolling than a legitimate concern. But at the time I wanted to be safe and closed the blog down temporarily. It’s now back of course, but I wanted to give you all an explanation, as I hated leaving you hanging without a reason. 

During this downtime I started to rethink of how I want to approach posting on the blog. And to be quite frank I was starting to fall into an old bad habit of mine of listening to post reviews, instead of listening and then posting a review when I’m ready. It’s so easy nowadays to fall into the trap of wanting to constantly keep up with every release and I find personally this ruins my own listening experience. So I realized I need to get away from my usual style and do something that fits me better. 

My first thought was a podcast and I even got to the point of test recording and a first episode written out. But unfortunately I’ve realized I simply just don’t have the proper amount of time to do one. As someone who has done a podcast before and felt I did it the right way, it takes A LOT of work and time to pull off, at least in the way I would want to do it. Just the recording and editing alone is arduous. So for now I’ve decided not to do a podcast. I’ve not ruled out doing one at another time, but for now it’s something that will be on the back burner. 

However, the tinkering with the podcast and the realization of the need to adapt my approach did lead me to an idea of how I want to approach writing moving forward. I look at the way reviews are approached nowadays, specifically by larger publications, and I see something that just isn’t natural in this constant rush to post reviews. Most people don’t listen to an album and form such an immediate judgement. And even after the initial judgement, that opinion can then shift even more with time. But reviews don’t reflect this; there’s a finiteness about them. You post the review, the grade and then the reviewer is put into a box of defending this take for…well forever it seems like. So I hope this new style and approach will be a better reflection of the way an average listener approaches music. Stay tuned!

For now I wanted to post all of the stuff I had written below for Spinning All The Records for April 2020. And thank you for reading!

Conway the Machine & The Alchemist – LULU

This is a really tight, short and cohesive album from start to finish. As always The Alchemist brings some really smooth beats, which fit the rapid fire delivery of Conway well. Not to mention the sampling used is great too, especially on “The Contract.” ScHoolboy Q delivers a solid feature on “Shoot Sideways,” but I especially enjoy Cormega’s feature on “They Got Sunny.” The veteran rapper spits absolute fire on his verses. If you enjoy coke bar rap and the work of the Griselda Records group (which I sang their praises of last year when I put Benny the Butcher on my album of the year list), you don’t want to miss this album. 8/10

Niall Horan – Heartbreak Weather

This is an enjoyable and solid album of soft rock meets pop love songs. Although I will say it’s not all straight-ahead love songs, as Horan weaves in themes throughout the album of insecurity, doubt and details of the hard road one can experience in finding love. The album has an overall sound of being bouncy, fun and upbeat, while Horan demonstrates himself to be a charismatic vocalist with range. And while there’s many fun moments like on “Everywhere,” there’s also some more serious and introspective moments that give this album a softness to balance it out (“Put a Little Love on Me” and “Still”). 7/10

Sam Hunt – SOUTHSIDE

I’m sure some of you wanted me to do a full review takedown of this album, but it’s just not worth it (and I don’t do rants anymore). The good of this album: opening track “2016” is by far the best song Hunt has ever done. It’s melodic, it has meaning and it has heart. While the Webb Pierce sample is just necessary, putting it aside, “Hard to Forget” is undeniably catchy. So is “Body Like a Backroad” (even though it feels completely shoehorned in the album). I still enjoy “Downtown’s Dead” as much as when I originally praised it on Fusion Country. And I appreciate the attempt at a bluegrass-influenced sound on “Let It Down.” I wish he would have explored this sound more.

Now to the bad and let’s just state the biggest issue. The ordering of the songs and overall theme of the story is a complete and disjointed mess. The overall flow of the album is like a zig zag, with no logical order whatsoever. “2016” should have been the closing song. “Kinfolks” is boring as hell and forgettable. “Young Once” is just absolutely stupid with it’s premise that dumb mistakes can be completely dismissed due to youth. “That Ain’t Beautiful” would be best described as having just a gross feel about it and features the worst side of Hunt and that is him wishing he was the Drake of country music.

“Breaking Up Was Easy in the 90s” has an annoying “I was born in le wrong generation” vibe. “Sinning With You” is the ultimate display of immaturity and also features nauseatingly cliche religious imagery that comes across so fake and insincere. “Drinkin’ Too Much” is best summed up as an abomination in every way, from his Drake impression to the lyrical content being disgusting and hypocritical. If Hunt ever indulged in his best tendencies, he could deliver a good album. But this is not it. 3/10

Western Centuries – Call the Captain

This band showed a lot of potential in their debut album. Their sophomore album was completely forgettable. And this album is very much along the same lines. There’s nothing inherently wrong with it, but it just doesn’t stand out in any way for me.

Jessi Alexander – Decatur County Red

I can essentially repeat the same for this album. That’s the double-edged sword of independent country, well at least from my perspective. On one hand, I’m much more inclined to listen to country music from the independent realm because I know how to find it. But that also means I listen to more of it and that kind of makes the bar higher too. It’s a brutally competitive space, so standing out is key. This is a decent album and Alexander has a nice voice, but after a few listens I just don’t feel like coming back to it.

Knxwledge – 1988

This is mostly an instrumental album, not surprising as Knxwledge is mostly known as a producer, most notably his collaboration with Anderson .Paak as NxWorries. So I only recommend this album if you’re a music nerd like me who can listen to a half-hour of random beats and sounds. And if you do listen you can get a great fill of pop, R&B, hip hop and even some gospel sounds. It’s quite a relaxing, chill listen I might add too. Knxwledge cements himself further as a standout producer on 1988. 8/10

Logan Ledger – Logan Ledger

All of this build up and an intriguing voice only for this to be another new act that leans hard on a nostalgic style and adds nothing fresh to it. So it just comes off as boring. I couldn’t even make it through one listen.

Maddie & Tae – The Way It Feels

I did not expect to be sticking this album here. But then again I didn’t expect this to be a giant disappointment and I didn’t feel like re-writing the Caitlyn Smith review. Just like Smith, Maddie & Tae throw away everything on this album that made their debut album great: warm melodies, sharp songwriting and harmonies that melt the ears. In their place is schlocky pop country, copy and paste songwriting, and little to no harmonies. I literally yawned several times going through this album because it’s so predictable in it’s approach. And there’s so many boring moments that the few standouts like “Die From A Broken Heart” just get lost in this mundane and drab collection of songs. It’s just another album in a sea of albums. What a damn shame for a promising duo. 5/10

Ruthie Collins – Cold Comfort

Honestly I just couldn’t engage with this album and I think a big reason why is the image and presentation is such a 180 from her “Ramblin’ Man” days that this just comes off as too calculated and insincere for me. Maybe I’ll be able to revisit this later, but for now this comes off as “dress up” to me.


Any other releases in late April and any in May will likely be covered in some way coming soon! But please feel free to engage in the comments and ask me as always about anything that isn’t covered or for further clarification on any comments I’ve made above! 

My Five Favorite Non-Country Albums of 2014

Here at Country Perspective we talk about country music of course. We review it, analyze it, present it and listen to it. Except today we make an exception. I’m going to talk about what I considered the best outside of country music. Contrarian person: “But this is country blog! I don’t care about non-country music!” Okay that’s cool. Don’t read this. If you’re still here thank you. Now let me ask you a question: Do you only eat one type of pie? No you don’t because that’s stupid. I enjoy eating a variety of different pies. Chocolate, apple, cherry you name it. Even though I love country music, I would go insane if I just listened to one type of music. I listen to all types and I’m not exaggerating. Now keep in mind too my “rules” for country music aren’t the same for other genres. For example, vulgarity is a much bigger part of hip-hop than other genres. But one universal rule for all genres in order to have good music: great lyrics with meaning and depth. So without further ado my five favorite non-country albums of 2014.

Run The Jewels – Run The Jewels 2

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Where has this hip-hop duo been all of my life? I never heard their first album and still haven’t. I heard a lot of hype about them on social media, so out of the blue I gave their album a listen. From the first listen I was absolutely blown away. This album hits you in the face from the first song and keeps throwing flurries in your face until the album ends. After all the album starts out with the ear grabbing shout of, “I’m going to bang this bitch the fuck out!” It’s vulgar, offensive, controversial and I absolutely love it. It’s definitely NSFW. El-P and Killer Mike were meant to make music together. My favorite track on the album would have to be “Blockbuster Night Part 1” because everything in this song works perfectly together. The final lyrics of the song really put an exclamation point on it.

This is really an album you have to hear for yourself because there is just so much to breakdown in it. This album tied with two other albums as my favorite of the year (the next album I’m getting ready to talk about and the other one you’ll know on Monday). Not only that, but this is probably my favorite hip-hop album I’ve ever listened to. It’s a damn shame this wasn’t nominated for a Grammy because it’s better than all of the Grammy nominations for Best Rap album.

The War on Drugs – Lost In The Dream

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The Philadelphia-based band composed of lead singer Adam Granduciel, David Hartley, Robbie Bennett, Charlie Hall, Joe Natchez and Anthony LaMarca have dazzled critics and fans everywhere with this album. Unless your name is Mark Kozelek, then you’ll probably love this album. Granduciel shows that he’s a musical genius with such a deep and complex album like Lost In The Dream. I mean who starts an album off with a nearly nine minute song? Most of the songs on this album are over five minutes long. It’s going to take you a while to listen to it, but trust me it is well worth it. Don’t listen to it in chunks either because this album is a journey and is meant to be listened to in full from start to finish.

As for my favorite track, it would be a toss-up between “Red Eyes” and “An Ocean in Between The Waves.” It really depends on my mood. I will say though my favorite line is in “An Ocean in Between The Waves.” It’s the brilliant line of “In my finest hour, can I be more than just a fool?” It’s such a simple line, yet it means so much. I will admit it can be hard to pay attention to the lyrics at times because the instrumentation is just so damn good. The amount of detail and thought behind each sound is unbelievable. This is the kind of album you put on right before you go for a long drive.

Rival Sons – Great Western Valkyrie 

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Along with The War on Drugs, Rival Sons proved to me that rock music isn’t dead. Behind country music, I would say rock music is my favorite. But in recent years I drifted away from the genre just like I did with country music. When I came across this group’s album and listened to it, they made me believe in rock music again. They also taught me that you can’t rely on the mainstream to guide you to the best rock music (just like country music). Great Western Valkyrie is the perfect blend of the classic rock throwback sound and modern rock influences. The album opens hot with “Electric Man” and really sets the tone for this album. There are several highlights on this album, from the loud and in your face “Open My Eyes” to the more subdued and tender “Belle Star.”

I was really surprised that very few “best of” albums list didn’t mention this because to me it’s easily one of the best rock albums I’ve heard in the last five years. This album was also shorted by the Grammys, but hey the Grammys suck most years and at least they stayed consistent. I know I appreciate Rival Sons’ Great Western Valkyrie and many other do too. Thank you Rival Sons for also restoring my faith in rock!

Weird Al Yankovic – Mandatory Fun

If you don’t like Weird Al Yankovic, you don’t like to laugh. In a world full of too much political correctness and super serious people, Weird Al is here to remind us it’s okay to laugh while listening to music. I not only got plenty of laughs from Mandatory Fun, but I was impressed by Weird Al’s lyrics and style choices. He also took a unique approach in promoting the album, as he released eight music videos over eight days all in different places the week he released the album. The music videos make the songs even better of course. One song in particular where the video makes it even better is “Foil,” which goes from talking about keeping food fresh to conspiracy theorists and aliens (that reminds me that Sturgill Simpson and Weird Al should make a song together).

My two favorites though on the album are “Word Crimes” and “Jackson Park Express.” The first, “Word Crimes,” is a song the world didn’t know it needed until they heard it. It blows the song it parodies, Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines,” out of the water in terms of lyrics and content. It sends a message that many people need (how to write like a human being) and it also takes a nice little jab at prima donna Prince. “Jackson Park Express” is a nine-minute, bizarre journey on a bus (sounds like an episode of Seinfeld) where a man goes from irrational to just plain creepy with his thoughts about a woman sitting across from him. It’s one of Weird Al’s best original songs ever.

Who would’ve thought when Weird Al started his musical career in 1976 that we would still making music after all these years? Keeping being awesome Weird Al and congrats on your first #1 album!

Pentatonix – PTX, Vol. III

A capella music! I told you I listen to everything. When I discovered Pentatonix last year I was enamored by them. How could they be so damn good while using zero instruments? Keep this in mind when listening to their music. If you had some unknown person off the street who had never heard this group’s music before they would have no idea there is no instrumentation involved because they do such a great job replicating the sounds with their mouths. And when they bring in instruments (usually the great Lindsey Stirling with her violin), they still knock it out of the park.

I usually like their covers of songs even better than the original versions of those songs. That’s the case again with their covers of “La La Latch” and “Rather Be” on PTX, Vol. III. The harmonies on “Rather Be” really blow me away, as you’ll find after listening to their music that harmonies are their biggest strength. Their original music doesn’t impress me as much as their covers yet, but they’re slowing getting there I think. My favorite original song off the album is “Standing By,” which shows off the group’s softer side. I think this A capella group will only get better with time.

Honorable Mentions:

Lindsey Stirling – Shatter Me 

The Foo Fighters – Sonic Highways 

Schoolboy Q – Oxymoron

(12/23) Late Addition: Hozier’s Self-Titled Debut Album